Fuel Recommendations for your Cub Cadet Snow Blower

Fuel Recommendations for your Cub Cadet Snow Blower

The fuel system in your Cub Cadet snow blower is designed for years of use. However, if you are not mindful of the fuel in your machine and allow it to go bad this can cause starting or running problems and damage to the fuel system. Here’s how to avoid most fuel-related problems in your snow blower.

1 – Do not use gasoline containing more than 10% ethanol.

Gasoline containing higher levels of ethanol is corrosive and attracts water, which can cause starting or running problems and damage to your snow blower’s fuel system. Engines produced for use in outdoor power equipment are not designed for gasoline with more than 10% ethanol.

Read your owner’s manual for information on the proper fuel to use in your snow blower.

2 – Remove fuel from your snow blower for summer storage.

When you’re finished using your snow blower for the season, drain the fuel out of your machine. There may still be fuel in the fuel line and carburetor so start your blower and allow it to run until no fuel is left in the machine.

Make sure there is no old fuel resting in your snow blower. Old fuel left in your snow blower during the off-season will deteriorate and cause problems for your machine. Your blower may not start or run properly and, in some cases, there will be damage to the fuel system.

3 – If you use your snow blower infrequently during the winter, add a fuel stabilizer to your fuel storage container.

Untreated gas left in your snow blower can deteriorate quickly, causing problems for your machine and the fuel system. By ensuring that the fuel in your snow blower is stabilized, you can minimize the chances of deterioration and damage.

4 – Store fuel properly.

Store your fuel in a clean, plastic, sealed container approved for fuel storage. This will help prevent rust and metallic contaminants from entering the fuel system. Close the vent, if equipped, when not in use and store the container away from direct sunlight. Fuel will deteriorate faster when exposed to air and sunlight.

If it takes longer than 30 days to use the fuel in the container, add a fuel stabilizer when you fill the container.

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Tips to Prepare your Snow Blower for Winter

Tips to Prepare your Snow Blower for Winter

Whether you’re prepping your snow blower for another year of snow removal or getting your new machine ready for its first winter, these snow blower maintenance tips will help ensure you’re prepared for snow this winter.

Tip #1

Change the oil in your snow blower. This should also be done after the first five hours of use this winter and after every subsequent season.

Old oil can cause problems for your machine’s engine, making it hard to start. If there is old oil, dispose of it properly. There is an oil drain plug in the back of your snow blower. Use a wrench to remove the plug and drain the oil into a container.

Tip #2

Drain old fuel and replace with fresh fuel. Old fuel can cause problems for your blower’s engine, making it hard to start.

Also, consider adding a fuel stabilizer so your fuel stays fresh even if you don’t need to use your snow blower.

Tip #3

Install a new spark plug, if necessary. Check your spark plug at the start of each season.

Disconnect the spark plug lead from the spark plug. Remove the spark plug with a spark plug socket wrench and remove debris from around the spark plug. Examine your spark plug and check for any damage. If there is damage, rust or corrosion on your snow blower’s spark plug, replace the spark plug.

Tip #4

Make sure all parts are moving smoothly. Make sure you tighten loose nuts and bolts. Your snow blower may vibrate during operation, causing nuts and bolts to loosen. Tighten those up to prevent them from falling off when your snow blower is in use.

Additionally, check to make sure belts and cables are in good condition. If you spot any damage, replace them. Any significant wear and tear call for a replacement to avoid the danger of a belt breaking during use.

After your snow blower is prepared for winter, start it up and let it run for a few minutes in a well-ventilated area to be certain everything works properly. Consider starting your machine every so often if it sits for an extended period.

Note: Not all snow blowers are the same. Different snow blowers utilize different types of fuel, oil and screws so consult your owner’s manual before repairing your equipment.

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Fuel Tips for Cub Cadet Snow Blowers

Fuel Tips for Snow Blowers

Your Cub Cadet snow blower’s fuel system is designed to withstand years of use. However, if you are not mindful of the fuel in your machine and allow it to go bad this can cause starting or running problems and damage to the fuel system. Read more as our experts explain how to avoid fuel-related problems in your Cub Cadet snow blower.

Fuel Recommendation #1 – Store fuel properly

Store your fuel in a clean, plastic, sealed container approved for fuel storage. This will help prevent rust and metallic contaminants from entering the fuel system. Close the vent, if equipped, when not in use and store the container away from direct sunlight. Fuel will deteriorate faster when exposed to air and sunlight.

If it takes longer than 30 days to use the fuel in the container, add a fuel stabilizer when you fill the container.

Fuel Recommendation #2 – Do not use gasoline with more than 10% ethanol

Gasoline containing higher levels of ethanol is corrosive and attracts water, which can cause starting or running problems and damage to your Cub Cadet snow blower’s fuel system. Engines produced for use in outdoor power equipment are not designed for gasoline with more than 10% ethanol. Read your Cub Cadet snow blower owner’s manual for information on the proper fuel to use in your machine.

Fuel Recommendation #3 – Remove fuel for summer storage

When winter comes to an end, drain the fuel out of your Cub Cadet snow blower. After draining, there may still be fuel in the fuel line and carburetor, so start your blower and allow it to run until no fuel is left in the machine.

This is an important step for off season storage because if old fuel is left in your snow blower it will deteriorate and cause problems for your machine. Your blower may not start or run properly and, in some cases, there will be damage to the fuel system.

Fuel Recommendation #4 –Add fuel stabilizer to your fuel storage container

If you use your Cub Cadet snow blower infrequently during the winter, add fuel stabilizer to your fuel storage container. Untreated gas left in your snow blower can deteriorate quickly, causing problems for your machine and the fuel system. Ensuring that the fuel in your Cub Cadet snow blower is stabilized minimizes the chances of deterioration and damage.

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5 Fuel Tips for Your Outdoor Power Equipment

5 Fuel Tips for Your Outdoor Power Equipment

Using the correct fuel in your outdoor power equipment is very important. If you do not use the proper fuel or change it in the proper time, your machine will suffer. Read on to learn what our experts have to say about fuel and how it affects your outdoor power equipment.

1 – Only purchase the amount of fuel that will be used in 30 days

After 30 days, the volatile compounds in the fuel start evaporating, and this occurs whether the gas is in your outdoor power equipment or in the gas can. As fuel sits and grows older, it evaporates and forms brown sticky deposits that eventually turn into a hard varnish. Deposits and varnish can plug passages in the carburetor, preventing the engine from running properly.

2 – Purchase gasoline with an octane rating of 87 or higher

Standard 87 octane gasoline is perfect for small engines. However, mid-grade or premium gas with an octane rating of 89 or higher can be used for engines that require the higher octane. Read your owner’s manual for information on the proper fuel to use in your outdoor power equipment.

3 – Don’t use gasoline with more than 10% ethanol

Engines produced for use in outdoor power equipment are not designed for gasoline with more than 10% ethanol. Using higher ethanol fuel blends can lead to engine damage and performance issues.

4 – Use gasoline without any ethanol

Ethanol-free gas will reduce the amount of moisture the gasoline can absorb from the atmosphere. Many areas carry ethanol-free gas. Visit https://www.pure-gas.org/ to locate ethanol-free gas stations near you.

5 – Use fuel stabilizer

When stabilizer is added to fuel they separate and create a thin film on top of the fuel to keep out air and moisture. These stabilizers also reduce the rate at which the fuel’s volatile compounds evaporate.

Try adding a stabilizer to your fuel the day the it is purchased to help it stay fresh longer.

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